Washington Extension

October 7, 2011

Medicare News

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that among Medicare beneficiaries in their last year of life in 2008, one-third had a surgical procedure performed. One-fifth had surgery in the last month of life, and one in ten had surgery in the last week of life. The rates of surgery varied dramatically across the country, but geographic variation is controversial because it is unclear whether it reflects unnecessary care or true differences in patient needs. This report adds to the influential research conducted by the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care showing Medicare beneficiaries living in areas of the country with lower intensity of end-of-life care do not have higher mortality rates.

The Michigan state legislature voted to end retiree health benefits for future and newer sitting legislators, in the face of state budget shortfalls. Retiree health benefits cost the state about $5 million in the last fiscal year. Governor Rick Snyder has promised to sign the legislation.

ACA Updates

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its highly-anticipated report on the criteria for determining essential health benefits (EHB) that ACA-qualified health plans must cover. The ACA defined ten categories of commonly-covered health services that plan benefits must include. The IOM identifies criteria for defining and updating specific components of the EHB, including: use a public deliberation process, include only medically necessary services that are value-based, promote some state flexibility, make annual updates based on credible evidence of effectiveness of benefits, and rely on typical coverage in the small employer market. Unlike Medicare’s coverage standard of “reasonable and necessary”, the IOM recommends higher standards for benefit coverage, such as the treatment demonstrate meaningful improvement over current effective services/treatments, and is cost effective. These criteria (among others) are aligned with the criterion that the EHB package, in aggregate, be affordable.

In ongoing litigation regarding the ACA, 26 states and the NFIB filed petitions to the Supreme Court to appeal the ruling in the Eleventh Circuit which struck down the individual mandate but upheld the remainder of the ACA. The Department of Justice also filed its own petition requesting review of the Circuit Court decision, significantly increasing the odds that this issue will appear on the Supreme Court’s docket this term (though the Court may have more than one case to choose from). Outstanding questions remain about the ability of the Court to rule on a federal tax law before anyone has actually paid the tax (i.e. the individual mandate penalty).

Nebraska will wait until the Supreme Court decides on the constitutionality of the ACA before setting up a health insurance exchange. According to the governor, the state is designing a program and applying for federal funding, but won’t build a “formal proposal” until the Court decides. Minnesota’s prospects are less clear: while the governor has secured millions of federal dollars, and has support to design a state-run exchange from the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce and some Republicans in the legislature, a debate rages about whether the governor needs authorization from the GOP-controlled legislature—which has been unwilling to pass a bill—to set up an exchange.

On the Hill

House Republicans released their 2012 draft budget for health, labor and education, totaling $153.4 billion. This compares with the Senate Democrats’ proposed budget of $165.3 billion. The Republicans’ draft bill prohibits funds to implement the ACA, as well as provisions to rescind funding already provided for ACA programs. Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-MT), chairman of the House Appropriations Labor-Health and Human Services subcommittee, recently wrote to the “Super Committee” recommending they cut ACA Medicaid expansions and affordability credits to achieve their $1.2 trillion deficit reduction goal.

Reports/Other News

About one quarter of retirees think that life in retirement is worse than before they retired, according to a RWJF/NPR/Harvard School of Public Health poll. This compares with only 14% of pre-retirees who expect that retired life will be worse. Retirees cite costs of medical treatment and long-term care as especially worrisome. Many fewer pre-retirees think that their health will be worse (13%) during retirement than retirees who say their health actually is worse (39%). Pre-retirees are also less confident (38%) that Medicare will provide benefits of at least equal value to current benefits than retirees (52%).

Average annual premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance in 2011 rose 8% for single coverage (to $5,249) and 9% for family coverage (to $15,073) over 2010 costs, according to this year’s Kaiser Family Foundation/HRET employer health benefits survey. The percentage of total premium paid by workers is similar to 2010 (18% for individuals, 28% for family coverage). Among firms offering coverage to employees, 26% offer retiree coverage, similar to 2010. State and local governments are most likely to offer retiree health benefits (83%), while large firms in the retail and wholesale industries are least likely (15% and 16%). Nearly all (91%) of offering large firms cover early retirees below age 65, while 71% cover Medicare-age retirees. AHIP blames rising insurance costs on prices for medical services, asserting that Washington must do more to control cost growth. Kaiser attributed 1-2% of the premium increase to provisions of the Affordable Care Act, including allowing children up to age 26 on their parents’ health insurance.

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report showing 170,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries received prescriptions for controlled substances from five or more physicians in 2008, indicating fraud and prescription drug abuse in Part D. In ten individual cases examined by the GAO, physicians did not know that their patients were receiving drugs prescribed by other physicians. Although Part D plans are required to perform retrospective drug utilization reviews to identify inappropriate or unnecessary medication use, plans are not authorized to restrict drug access based on the findings.

Visit Extend Health — the nation’s largest private Medicare exchange.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: